01 Dec

Controlling static electricity on concrete

Q: Why can’t bare or sealed concrete be used as a method for controlling static electricity in a electronics manufacturing environment verse utilizing a Conductive or Static Dissipative covering and/or coating?

A: I’ve done some studies on ESD resistive characteristics of the several different floor surfaces. In light of the following question, I just snapped some photos of ESD readings on the following surfaces:

ESD reading on Dry Concrete

ESD reading on Dry Concrete

Bare concrete (dry). Results- barely conductive, very humidity dependant; in the insulative range(1E09-1E12)

ESD reading on Asphalt

ESD reading on Asphalt

Asphalt. Results- unacceptable; above insulative.

ESD reading on Dirt

ESD reading on Dirt

Dirt. Results- pretty good, acually comes in at barely dissipative; Upside, cheap; Downside, hard to clean.

Reading on ESD Carpet

Reading on ESD Carpet

ESD Carpet (Ground Zero Information). Results- ESD conductive(2.5e4-1.0E6).

Reading on ESD Tile

Reading on ESD Tile

ESD Tile (Ground Zero Information). Results – ESD dissipative(1.0E6-1.0E8).

Reading on Sealed Concrete

Reading on Sealed Concrete

Sealed Concrete. Results-unacceptable; a sealed concrete is necessary for heavy foot traffic, but the very thing that would make the concrete conductive is sealed out- moisture. This floor could be made dissipative very easily with an ESD chemical (Ground Zero Information).

Reading on Particle Board

Reading on Particle Board

Particle board. See asphalt

4 thoughts on “Controlling static electricity on concrete

  1. You’ll also have to account for the gravel, sand and plastic membrane that might want to go underneath.

    Once you might have the necessary soil excavated it is best to ttamp the soil
    ensuring it’s goopd and flat.

  2. I work in a large warehouse where the shocking has just begun a couple of weeks ago all of a sudden. After various theories, I feel it started from the thin layer of dust across the concrete operations floor causing a charge to the foeklifts then to the metal carriages. When we hand pull these ‘totes’ is when we get zapped. Not once, but continuous as we pull the wheeled tired to the next position. Is this a fair theory since the dust was not an issue in the past?

    • This would depend on the environment and what the dust was made of. Concreate alone is an insulator that does not conduct static charge but if the shaving that make the dust have for example metal it is possible but more would need to be known about the environment feel free to call us directly at 1-877-463-9376 so we can help with getting that additional information and a solution to this problem.

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